Admissions, Choosing A School, Diversity, Low Income Students

Best Private Colleges for Low-Income Students

No Comments 24 March 2017

The 73 private colleges that satisfy the selection criteria enroll a total of 253,926 undergraduate students, including 48,876 Federal Pell Grant recipients (19%). The average net price is $8,716, ranging from $353 to $12,389. The average 6-year graduation rate for Federal Pell Grant recipients is 83%, ranging from 50% to 100%.

The colleges are listed in alphabetical order.

Best Private Colleges Percentage
Pell Grant
Recipients
Net Price for
Low-Income Students
(AGI $0 to $30,000)
6-Year
Graduation Rates for
Pell Grant Recipients(2013)
Amherst College 20% $3,700 94%
Barnard College 18% $9,231 86%
Bates College 11% $7,426 88%
Berea College 83% $3,575 58%
Blue Mountain College 53% $8,246 55%
Bob Jones University 41% $11,323 58%
Bowdoin College 14% $5,925 90%
Brigham Young University – Idaho 39% $5,374 54%
Brown University 14% $3,186 93%
California Institute of Technology 11% $6,696 91%
Carleton College 12% $11,760 92%
Christian Brothers University 42% $6,466 56%
Claremont McKenna College 12% $9,225 85%
Colby College 11% $1,710 89%
Colgate University 12% $12,034 100%
College of the Atlantic 30% $12,014 75%
College of the Holy Cross 16% $11,808 88%
College of the Ozarks 62% $10,296 60%
Connecticut College 13% $9,282 86%
Cornell University 16% $11,665 92%
Dartmouth College 14% $7,529 92%
Davidson College 13% $8,289 94%
Duke University 14% $8,777 94%
Franklin and Marshall College 14% $10,661 87%
Georgetown University 13% $9,638 92%
Grinnell College 21% $8,112 84%
Harvey Mudd College 13% $8,770 80%
Haverford College 15% $8,881 92%
Hobart & William Smith Colleges 18% $11,994 78%
Illinois College 33% $12,266 68%
Johns Hopkins University 13% $10,049 95%
Kenyon College 10% $2,813 85%
Lafayette College 11% $11,995 90%
Massachusetts Institute of Technology 18% $5,128 88%
McDaniel College 31% $11,740 67%
Middlebury College 11% $4,904 89%
Milligan College 36% $7,904 52%
Northwestern University 14% $11,700 93%
Oberlin College 11% $11,788 89%
Pitzer College 16% $12,389 90%
Pomona College 17% $5,807 93%
Presbyterian College 23% $9,972 50%
Princeton University 12% $3,630 97%
Reed College 17% $9,423 76%
Rice University 17% $6,468 91%
Russell Sage College 46% $12,361 80%
Saint Johns University 19% $12,254 70%
Saint Josephs College 32% $11,072 71%
Salem College 56% $12,272 58%
Sewanee:  The University of the South 18% $9,107 70%
Skidmore College 15% $11,354 91%
Smith College 23% $11,619 90%
St. Olaf College 15% $11,792 88%
Stanford University 16% $2,841 91%
Swarthmore College 14% $8,537 89%
Trinity College 12% $11,030 91%
Trinity University 15% $8,977 78%
Tufts University 11% $10,574 92%
Union College- NY 16% $8,682 89%
University of Chicago 14% $8,964 92%
University of Notre Dame 12% $9,048 92%
University of Pennsylvania 14% $9,799 93%
University of Richmond 20% $10,742 82%
Vanderbilt University 14% $6,905 87%
Vassar College 22% $10,558 89%
Washington and Lee University 10% $353 90%
Washington University in St Louis 6% $11,100 92%
Wellesley College 19% $9,735 91%
Wesleyan University 18% $6,009 94%
Whittier College 36% $11,378 66%
Williams College 19% $3,127 92%
Yale University 13% $3,918 96%

Take a look at this list of best public colleges for low-income students.

Admissions, Choosing A School, Diversity, Low Income Students

Best Public Colleges for Low-Income Students

No Comments 24 March 2017

The 123 public colleges that satisfy the selection criteria enroll a total of 2,015,267 total undergraduate students, including 603,852 Federal Pell Grant recipients (30%). The average net price is $8,984, ranging from $3,364 to $12,464. The 6-year graduation rate for Federal Pell Grant recipients is 63%, ranging from 50% to 88%.

The colleges are listed in alphabetical order.

Best Public Colleges Percentage
Pell Grant
Recipients
Net Price for
Low-Income Students(AGI $0 to $30,000)
6-Year
Graduation Rates for
Pell Grant Recipients (2013)
Appalachian State University 26% $7,671 63%
Ball State University 35% $9,260 51%
California Polytechnic State Univ. – San Luis Obispo 20% $10,611 56%
California State Polytechnic Univ. – Pomona 44% $6,984 51%
California State University – Fullerton 41% $3,364 50%
California State University – Long Beach 47% $5,549 54%
California State University – Stanislaus 58% $3,794 53%
Central Michigan University 35% $10,753 60%
Citadel Military College of South Carolina 24% $11,417 59%
Clemson University 18% $11,253 74%
College of William and Mary 12% $5,136 86%
Colorado State University 26% $10,449 56%
CUNY Bernard M Baruch College 45% $5,318 69%
CUNY College of Staten Island 45% $7,635 51%
CUNY Queens College 38% $4,207 58%
Dakota State University 24% $11,029 52%
East Carolina University 32% $10,257 52%
Fitchburg State University 34% $9,897 53%
Florida International University 58% $9,039 53%
Georgia Institute of Technology 19% $6,138 78%
Grand Valley State University 36% $11,530 62%
Illinois State University 26% $11,958 63%
Indiana University – Bloomington 19% $4,855 64%
Iowa State University 23% $8,721 58%
James Madison University 13% $11,154 77%
Longwood University 23% $11,651 56%
Louisiana State University 20% $5,692 58%
Massachusetts College of Liberal Arts 45% $10,364 53%
Massachusetts Maritime Academy 19% $5,159 57%
Michigan State University 24% $6,434 72%
Michigan Technological University 27% $8,056 61%
Missouri University of Science and Technology 26% $10,832 56%
New College of Florida 29% $6,411 66%
New Jersey Institute of Technology 39% $11,445 57%
North Carolina State University at Raleigh 22% $6,451 70%
North Dakota State University 23% $11,272 50%
Northern State University 23% $11,757 52%
Ohio State University 22% $10,566 74%
Oklahoma State University 29% $9,630 55%
Purdue University 21% $7,153 59%
Radford University 28% $11,448 59%
Ramapo College of New Jersey 25% $9,805 60%
Salisbury University 22% $8,468 66%
San Diego State University 40% $6,980 63%
Sonoma State University 30% $10,077 53%
Southern Connecticut State University 35% $10,835 51%
St Mary’s College of Maryland 15% $4,827 64%
Stony Brook University 35% $8,770 70%
SUNY at Albany 37% $10,515 67%
SUNY at Binghamton 27% $10,585 75%
SUNY at Buffalo 28% $10,146 66%
SUNY at Fredonia 35% $10,190 60%
SUNY at Geneseo 23% $9,704 71%
SUNY College at Brockport 41% $8,747 66%
SUNY College at Cortland 27% $10,442 65%
SUNY College at New Paltz 28% $8,551 69%
SUNY College at Oneonta 29% $8,507 59%
SUNY College at Plattsburgh 35% $8,366 54%
SUNY College at Purchase 32% $12,423 59%
SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry 27% $11,586 73%
Texas A & M University 22% $4,304 72%
Texas Tech University 29% $9,733 50%
The College of New Jersey 18% $6,910 73%
The Evergreen State College 44% $9,951 60%
The University of Tennessee 30% $8,770 54%
The University of Texas at Austin 27% $10,696 70%
The University of Texas at Dallas 35% $8,471 55%
Towson University 25% $9,034 54%
Truman State University 19% $7,798 62%
University of Arizona 33% $11,562 53%
University of California – Berkeley 32% $8,607 88%
University of California – Davis 43% $10,492 75%
University of California – Irvine 43% $8,532 87%
University of California – Los Angeles 36% $8,027 86%
University of California – Merced 60% $8,720 59%
University of California – Riverside 56% $9,678 68%
University of California – San Diego 43% $8,362 84%
University of California – Santa Barbara 38% $10,190 79%
University of California – Santa Cruz 45% $10,862 71%
University of Central Florida 38% $10,637 64%
University of Delaware 12% $10,643 80%
University of Florida 32% $7,207 81%
University of Georgia 24% $8,558 72%
University of Hawaii at Manoa 31% $7,506 57%
University of Illinois at Chicago 49% $9,663 54%
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign 20% $7,801 78%
University of Iowa 19% $8,584 60%
University of Maine at Fort Kent 32% $9,912 52%
University of Maryland – Baltimore 27% $11,501 61%
University of Maryland – College Park 19% $6,938 75%
University of Massachusetts Amherst 25% $11,064 66%
University of Massachusetts – Lowell 30% $10,718 52%
University of Michigan – Ann Arbor 16% $5,470 82%
University of Michigan – Dearborn 43% $8,483 56%
University of Minnesota – Duluth 24% $8,312 52%
University of Minnesota – Morris 29% $8,797 55%
University of Minnesota – Twin Cities 22% $8,650 63%
University of Mississippi 30% $10,898 51%
University of Nebraska – Lincoln 20% $11,395 58%
University of North Carolina at Asheville 32% $8,127 52%
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 21% $3,823 86%
University of North Carolina at Charlotte 40% $8,307 53%
University of North Carolina at Greensboro 44% $7,923 52%
University of North Carolina – Wilmington 28% $10,912 65%
University of Northern Iowa 27% $10,283 60%
University of Oregon 26% $12,083 56%
University of South Florida 41% $6,735 62%
University of Utah 32% $11,640 61%
University of Vermont 19% $10,742 73%
University of Virginia 12% $9,615 84%
University of Washington – Bothell 35% $7,304 69%
University of Washington – Seattle 25% $7,054 77%
University of Wisconsin – Eau Claire 27% $8,695 58%
University of Wisconsin – La Crosse 23% $9,225 64%
University of Wisconsin – Madison 15% $9,235 73%
University of Wisconsin – Platteville 31% $9,518 51%
University of Wisconsin – Stevens Point 34% $8,295 54%
Virginia Military Institute 15% $5,129 77%
Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University 17% $12,446 78%
Washington State University 33% $10,296 59%
Western Michigan University 40% $12,464 53%
Western Washington University 26% $8,762 65%
Westfield State University 26% $11,181 54%

Take a look at this list of best private colleges for low-income students.

Admissions, Choosing A School

Colleges for Students with Average GPAs

No Comments 14 March 2017

A 4.0 GPA is not a requirement to get into college. Take a look at this list of colleges that will accept students with GPAs that range from 3.2 to 3.6.

 

Simpson University

Redding, Calif.

Average GPA – 3.51

Simpson University is a Christian institution with a commitment to world service that offers more than 25 educational programs. The university incorporates faith in to every academic program, such as its faith-based nursing program in which caring is at the core of the major classes.

 

Saint Ambrose University

Davenport, Iowa

Average GPA – 3.28

Saint Ambrose is a small, private college that offers 60 undergraduate degrees, 13 master’s and three doctoral programs. Because of the school’s mission to enrich the lives of other, Ambrose students typically volunteer more than 70,000 service hours a year. Student athletes also are required to complete at least three service projects a year.

 

The College of Saint Rose

Albany, N.Y.

Average GPA – 3.5

The College of Saint Rose teaches its students to focus on applying what they’ve learned to make the world around them about better. The surrounding urban environment expands the college’s opportunities for educational experiences and encourages students to be leaders in the community.

 

Carroll University

Waukesha, Wis.

Average GPA – 3.3

Carroll University prepares its students for lifelong learning and service in a global community. The university prepares students to engage with the world through service learning, volunteer work, and participation in the cross-cultural experience that is at the center of the General Education curriculum.

                        

Saint Martin’s University

Lacey, Wash.

Average GPA – 3.45

Saint Martin’s seeks to promote the common good. Students are taught to think with heart. Armed with an enriching and challenging curriculum, Saint Martin’s students are ready to go out into the world and make a positive difference.

 

Emerson College

Boston

Average GPA – 3.6

Emerson College is considered to be the premier institution in liberal arts higher education dedicated to communication and the arts. The college is internationally recognized in its fields of specialization, which include journalism, visual and media arts and more.

 

Montclair State University

Montclair, N.J.

Average GPA – 3.2

Montclair prepares its students for a lifetime of professional and personal success. The university was named the best public university in New Jersey by Forbes. Its vibrant campus community and cutting edge technologies help the university to live up to that title.

 

Ohio Wesleyan University

Delaware, Ohio

Average GPA – 3.4

Ohio Wesleyan is filled with people who are eager to learn and make connections within their society. There are nearly 90 majors to choose from, and 27 percent of students actually choose to pursue at least two majors. 81 percent of recent graduates are able to get a career in their field.

African American Students, Choosing A School, College Spotlight

Top 10 Historically Black Colleges and Universities

No Comments 14 February 2017

In honor of Black History month, we have compiled a list of the 10 best Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) in the country. Check out their College Greenlight profiles to learn more.

Spelman College – Atlanta

Spelman College is a private, all-women’s college, which originally was established as a female seminary in 1881. It is ranked in the top 50 liberal arts college in the country and consistently is ranked as the best HBCU in the nation. The college is the second-largest producer of black medical students in the country. Spelman’s academic departments have individual accreditation, which makes it one of the most accredited schools in the country.

Xavier University of Louisiana – New Orleans

Xavier has been continuing its mission of promoting leadership and service-based education initiatives since its founding in 1925. The university is the first educational institution in the nation that has produced black graduates with dual undergraduate degrees in biological/life sciences and the physical sciences.

Tuskegee University – Tuskegee, Ala.

Tuskegee University was founded by Booker T. Washington in 1881. The Princeton Review and U.S. News and World Report both ranked the university as one of the best HBCUs in the country. The university offers more than 40 undergraduate programs and almost 20 doctoral programs and professional degrees.

Howard UniversityWashington, D.C.

Howard is a research university that was founded in 1867 and is considered to be the most comprehensive HBCU in the country. The university offers a medical, law, dentistry and pharmacy colleges, along with a multiple research facilities that have been internally recognized in their respective fields.

Claflin University – Orangeburg, S.C.

Claflin was founded in 1869 by Methodist missionaries to educate freedmen.. The university boasts a world-class faculty and was recently named the best liberal arts college in South Carolina. Claflin offers more than 35 undergraduate and graduate degree programs.

North Carolina A&T State University – Greensboro, N.C.

North Carolina A&T State was established in 1891 as a vocational college for black students. Today, the college is recognized as a top-notch research university with the best college of engineering in the country. It has produced the most black engineers who pursue a master’s or terminal degree in their chosen field.

Hampton University ­– Hampton, Va.

Hampton University was established in 1868 as a school that would teach freedmen and their children to enter into citizenship. The university offers more than 75 different degree programs in 40 areas of study across 11 schools. Hampton also holds the rare distinction of being the only HBCU to ever have 100 percent control over a NASA mission.

Morehouse College – Atlanta

Morehouse was founded in 1867 as a private institution for men and has graduated more black men than any other school. The college’s mission includes educating students about black history and culture through programs and scholarships. Martin Luther King Jr. and Spike Lee are Morehouse alumni.

Florida A&M University – Tallahassee, Fla.

Florida A&M was founded in 1887 as an institution dedicated to African-American education. The university offers 54 bachelor’s degrees, 29 master’s degrees, three professional degrees and 12 doctoral programs. These programs have increased black student involvement in science, technology, engineering and math.

Fisk University – Nashville, Tenn.

Fisk was founded in 1866, shortly after the end of the Civil War. As part of its core curriculum, Fisk students must take one course that explores African-American literature and African history. The university also is home to the first chapter of the Phi Beta Kappa Society on a predominantly black campus.

Choosing A School, Fly-In Focus

Applying To & Attending College Fly-in Programs

No Comments 12 August 2016

College fly-in and diversity programs are amazing opportunities for first-gen, low-income and underrepresented students to make important campus visits funded by a scholarship or all expenses paid by the school.  Held at institutions around the country, fly-in and diversity programs give students the chance to sit in on a class, stay overnight in a dorm, meet faculty and current students, and get a real feel for a college’s culture.

Thinking about participating in one of these great programs?  Here are some tips for students on how to find, apply, and prepare for a fly-in or diversity program.

Decide What Programs You’re Interested In

Take a look at College Greenlight’s blog post to see a comprehensive list of colleges that offer these sorts of programs.  Consider which colleges are ones you are interested in attending—you don’t want to waste both your and a college’s time by attending a program at a college you wouldn’t consider, and taking a spot for someone who wants to be there.

Once you’ve narrowed down your list of colleges check into the details of each program and decide if you’re eligible or if it will work with your needs and schedule.  Some programs are only for certain students, like those who are first-gen or come from underrepresented backgrounds or are for students interested in specific fields such as STEM.  You’ll also want to take a look at program dates and deadlines, and see if these particular programs have open applications and that their program dates will work with your schedule.  Junior and senior year can be a very busy time, but taking time to visit a college campus, especially for a fly-in or diversity program, can be worth it come college application time.

Collect Your Materials & Submit Applications

Once you’ve decided on what programs you’ll apply to, you’ll have to collect the necessary materials and fill out an application.  Do your research—each program may have very different requirements, from essays to transcripts to letters of recommendation, and some of these you’ll have to plan ahead to get in time.

It’s important to note that many of these programs are selective and have very limited seats available.  Some are on a first-come, first-serve basis; others are based on merit or a student’s demonstrated interest in the institution.  To have the best chance of getting accepted, apply early and, if possible, use your application materials (like essays) to explain why you are interested in that particular college.

Prepare for Your Visit

Once you’ve been accepted to a program, it’s time to get excited for your visit! It’s also time to prepare for taking advantage of your time on campus.   Make a list of questions you’d like to ask admissions staff, faculty and current students.  Depending on your interests, these questions can include information about financial aid, academics or the college’s culture.   Ask fellow students how they like the college and any other questions that might help give you an idea of how you’d fit in on campus.  Do you participate in sports or clubs or activities you plan to pursue after high school? Do you want to know what there is to do in the surrounding community? These are just a few examples of potential questions, and don’t be shy—ask away!

Interested in a specific field of study?  It can also be helpful to find out before where the faculty offices and classroom buildings are located and see if you can find some time to visit them.  Each fly-in and diversity program is different, and you may only see different parts of campus or you may get a tour of all the buildings.

Follow Up & Apply

Many college admissions professionals agree that the campus visit can be the most crucial part of deciding if a college is the right match or fit for a student.  If after you after attending a fly-in or diversity program you are still interested in the college, the real work starts!

If you met with admissions officers or faculty, you can demonstrate your interest by following up and thanking them for your time.  This not only is polite, but also helps them remember you when you send in your application later.

Don’t forget the most important part: applying!   Take note of deadlines and fill out your application to the school when it opens.  By participating in the diversity or fly-in program you already have an advantage, but there is still the last step: work hard and get accepted!

 

 

 

 

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