Prepare for College, Resources

Community Based Organization Spotlight: 10,000 Degrees

No Comments 20 January 2017

10,000 Degrees is a community-based organization dedicated to achieving educational equity. This organization, located in San Rafael, CA,  aims to support low-income students who demonstrate a need for access to higher education. Participants leave this program poised to impact their communities and the world.

Every 10,000 Degrees participant comes from a low-income household. Ninety percent of students are first-generation, and 84 percent of participants are people of color. The organization offers multiple programs to provide college accessibility.

One program is the 10,000 Degrees Institution. This four-day program is open to rising high school sophomores and juniors from Marin or Sonoma County, Calif., who demonstrate financial need. Participants receive a crash course in college life during The program; they live with a roommate, learn how to choose a college and pay for tuition. They also receive tips for succeeding on the ACT/SAT.

After attending the program, participants automatically become a part of the 10,000 Degrees Year-Round Program. A 10,000 Degrees college advisor guides students through the college application and financial aid processes.

10,000 Degrees has prepared 18,700 students for college. These alumni often return to assist the 6,200 students and families that 10,000 Degrees serves each year. 10,000 Degrees students also receive $14.4 million annually in financial aid. Each student receives an average financial aid package of $16,000 each year. The aid does not include loans and does not need to be paid back.

Students served by the organization are annually awarded $2.6 billion in scholarships. The 10,000 Degrees Undergraduate scholarships are open to students who demonstrate financial need. Applicants must be enrolled in a program full time toward their first associate’s degree, bachelor’s degree or teaching credential for the 2017-2018 school year.

10,000 Degrees offers a number of undergraduate scholarships. The majority are open to students from Marin and Sonoma County, Calif.. A few, however, are open to students from the Bay Area.

Apply for the 10,000 Degrees Institution by March 2.

Prepare for College, Resources

Winter Break Checklist

No Comments 26 December 2016

The moment you’ve been waiting for is finally here – it’s winter break! A time for catching up with friends and celebrating the holidays with loved ones. This is also a great opportunity to get a head start on college applications. Here are some suggestions for how to spend your time over break.

Search for scholarships. Is your College Greenlight profile up to date? The more information you give us in your profile, the more scholarships we can match you to! While you’re on break from school, this is a great time to go out into your community to look for local scholarship opportunities. Community scholarships may be smaller in award amount, but those amounts add up! Visit places like your library, local businesses, and your community newspapers to get started.

Find volunteer opportunities. Academic excellence is vital in college, but it is not the only thing schools want to see. Colleges are looking for well-rounded students to add to their student body. A great way to show this is by volunteering in your area. Colleges value students who are active citizens in their community. A shelter, a local chapter of a national organization, or your church are great places to look for volunteer positions.

Go on college visits. Are you interested in any colleges fairly close to home? Winter break is a great time to check out these schools! While students will not be on campus at these times, it is still valuable to visit. You’ll be able to get a feel for the campus and have questions answered by various members of the college’s staff.

Write college application essays. A good essay will take a lot of thought and time. For those applications due in the second half of the school year, winter break is a great time to gather your thoughts and start writing those essays. If you take a few days to develop an idea, plan out your essay, and then compose, as opposed to doing it all a few days before your essay is due, you will likely see better results!

Work on your Greenlight Scholars Application. Use winter break to make sure your Greenlight Scholars Application is in tip-top shape! Clean up your social media accounts. Make sure there’s nothing on there you wouldn’t want a college admissions counselor to see. Take the time to reflect on the colleges you’re interested in to see if there are any other colleges you should add to your list.

One suggestion for your winter break – relax! Recharge your batteries and finish out the school year strong!

Pay for College, Undocumented Students

Colleges that Meet 100% of Financial Need for Undocumented Students

No Comments 22 December 2016

College affordability is a big concern for many students and their families. Paying for college is even more difficult for undocumented students. Luckily, there are several colleges that are dedicated to making undocumented students’ college dreams come true. These colleges meet 100% of the students’ demonstrated financial need with grants, student employment, scholarships, and, in some cases, student loans.

We have compiled an alphabetical list of colleges that meet 100% of financial need for undocumented students. If you are interested in learning more, check out these schools on College Greenlight. Please note that these colleges pledge to meet a student’s full demonstrated financial need. Most students will still have an expected family contribution they are responsible for.

Amherst College Amherst is committed to meeting 100% of the full demonstrated financial need of every admitted student, regardless of citizenship or immigration status. Financial aid packages for non-U.S. citizens include on-campus employment and institutional grant aid, without loans. Undocumented and DACA students must submit the CSS/Financial Aid PROFILE form and federal income tax returns or income verification to apply for financial aid.

Bates College Bates treats undocumented and DACA students as domestic applicants and meets 100% of demonstrated financial need for those admitted to the college, regardless of citizenship or immigration status. Undocumented and DACA students must submit the College Board PROFILE and provide federal tax returns or other income verification to Student Financial Services in order to apply for financial aid.

Bowdoin College Regardless of citizenship, Bowdoin is committed to meeting 100% of all students’ demonstrated financial need. The college will provide an institutional package comprised of grants and on-campus employment.

Bryn Mawr College The college does not separate undocumented students into an “international” or “domestic” pool. Bryn Mawr will meet the demonstrated financial need of any student, including those who are undocumented.

Brown University As long as students self-identify as undocumented and request aid at the time of their application submission, Brown will meet 100% of the student’s financial need. Eligibility for aid is solely based on financial need.

Carleton College Only students with DACA status are considered among all other legal permanent residents and US citizens at Carleton College. The college only offers admission to students whose need they are able to meet.

Colby College Colby is dedicated to meeting 100% demonstrated financial need of all students, regardless of background. Undocumented students are treated like international students.

Columbia University Undocumented citizen applicants at Columbia University are eligible for the same need-blind admissions policy that applies to US citizens, permanent residents, and eligible non-citizens. The university guarantees to meet 100% of all admitted first-year students’ demonstrated financial need for all four years, regardless of citizenship.

Cornell University – DACA students are recognized in the domestic financial aid pool and Cornell meets the full demonstrated need for all admitted domestic students. These students will be considered in the DACA/domestic aid pool for their entire time at Cornell.

Dartmouth CollegeDartmouth will meet full need of undocumented students with employment, scholarships and/or loans.  Freshmen must complete the CSS/Financial Aid PROFILE and the College Board’s Institutional Documentation Service (IDOC).

Duke UniversityUndocumented students must apply to Duke as international students; counselors can call and inform Duke that the applicant is undocumented. Eligibility is based solely on financial need. The university will meet 100% of demonstrated need.

Emory UniversityEmory considers students who are granted DACA status to be domestic students, and the university meets 100% of demonstrated financial need for all admitted domestic students.

Haverford College The college will meet 100% of demonstrated need for all students, regardless their background.

Macalester College Macalester is committed to internationalism and multiculturalism and meets 100% of demonstrated financial need for all admitted students. Undocumented students who are not permitted by law to work in the US will receive additional student loans to replace the amount typically earned through an on-campus job.

Massachusetts Institute of Technology – An applicant’s citizenship status will not have any impact on their chances of admission at MIT or the availability of full need-based financial aid.

Middlebury College – Undocumented or DACA students should follow the same application process as any other student. Middlebury will meet 100% demonstrated financial need for all admitted students. To apply financial aid, just complete the CSS profile by the deadlines indicated on the site.

Oberlin College An undocumented/DACA student indicates their interest in applying for need-based and/or merit-based financial aid on the Common Application. If that student is accepted, Oberlin will meet 100% of demonstrated need.

Occidental CollegeOccidental considers undocumented students to be international students and the college will fully fund 2-4 international students every year. Undocumented students must apply for financial aid at the time they apply for admission.

Pomona College Pomona will meet 100% of need for DACA and undocumented students. The college will provide these students with the support and resources they need in the application process.

Princeton University – Admission to Princeton is offered to students regardless of their ability to pay, and the full need of every admitted student is met regardless of citizenship.

Rice University Rice will meet the full demonstrated financial need of undocumented and DACA students through scholarships, work study, and available loans.

Smith CollegeSmith meets 100% of the demonstrate need for all admitted students who apply for financial aid by the appropriate deadlines. Since federal aid is not available for undocumented and DACA students, Smith will provide institutional, need-based financial aid in its place.

Swarthmore College Swarthmore’s admissions process for undocumented and DACA students is need-blind. The college will meet 100% of demonstrated need with aid awards that do not include loans that need to be repaid.

Tufts UniversityTufts will meet 100% of demonstrated need of all-admitted students. While procedures for financial aid vary between domestic and international applicants, undocumented students are considered domestic and will receive institutional need-based financial aid like U.S. citizens.

University of Chicago All students, regardless of citizenship, will have their full demonstrated financial need met. The university will also assist undocumented students in other ways, such as help with visa status.

University of Notre DameNotre Dame admits and meets the full demonstrated need of undocumented students.

University of Pennsylvania – The university will meet 100% of a student’s demonstrated financial need without loans. Need-based financial aid is awarded when the student is admitted to Penn.

Vassar College Undocumented students are considered international applicants at Vassar. The college will meet the entire demonstrated need of these students for the entirety of their enrollment at the college.

Wellesley CollegeWellesley is committed to meeting 100% of demonstrated need for all admitted undocumented and DACA students. These students are considered international applicants.

Wesleyan University – Wesleyan meets 100% of demonstrated need for all admitted students who apply for financial aid. The college treats undocumented students just like any U.S. citizen or permanent resident.

Williams CollegeWilliams College will meet 100% of demonstrated financial need for every admitted student, every year.

Yale UniversityYale admits students without regard to their ability to pay and the institution meets 100% of demonstrated need for all students without loans.

Resources

Foster Youth Lack Access to College

No Comments 15 November 2016

According to a report from the Education Commission of the States, Strengthening Policies for Foster Youth Postsecondary Attainment, only 3 percent of the 415,000 children in foster care will ever graduate college with a Bachelor’s degree, compared with 32.5 percent of the U.S. population aged 25 and older. Only 46 percent of foster youth graduate from high school, compared with 88.4 percent of the U.S. population aged 25 and old.

There have been some improvements in financial aid for foster youth. The Foster Care Independence Act of 1999 established the John H. Chafee Foster Care Independence Program (CFCIP). The Education Training Vouchers program was added to CFCIP in 2002. The 2008 Fostering Connections to Success and Increasing Adoptions Act (FCA) also improved college access for foster children. Changes were made to the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) in July 2009 to help foster children.

The Education Training Voucher (ETV) program provides up to $5,000 per year for college students who are in foster care, were adopted from foster care after reaching age 16, or aged out of foster care. They must have obtained a high school diploma or GED, reapply annually and maintain satisfactory academic progress. The funds are available for enrollment in a 2-year or 4-year college or university or for enrollment in accredited vocational and technical training programs. Eligible students may receive grants for up to five years or until they reach age 23. Apply through your state’s Child Welfare Agency. Some state programs are administered by Foster Care to Success.

The Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) considers students to be independent if they were in foster care at any time after reaching age 13. These students are considered to be independent even if they were adopted at age 13 or older. The FAFSA also includes other questions designed to identify foster children so that they can be directed to resources available to them.

There are also scholarships and tuition waivers available to foster children. The state tuition waivers usually involve just tuition and not other costs, such as textbooks and living expenses.

The report from the Education Commission of the States made several recommendations for helping foster children pursue a college education:

  • Expand foster care to cover students beyond age 18 who are enrolled in college
  • Eliminate tuition waiver requirements that are particularly challenging for foster children, such as requirements for financial contributions, volunteer service or maintaining a higher GPA than is required for federal student aid
  • Standardize eligibility criteria across states, with regard to age, deadlines, types of colleges, etc.
  • Expand state tuition waivers to cover other costs, such as textbooks, housing, transportation and childcare.

Resources

100% Meet Need Colleges

17 Comments 29 August 2016

One of the biggest concerns students and their families have about college is affordability. Rising costs at the nation’s public and private schools keep qualified students from considering the best options.

Fortunately, many colleges are committed to remaining affordable to each admitted student regardless of their financial circumstances. A college or university that promises to make sure every penny of an accepted student’s demonstrated financial need is covered through grants, work-study, scholarships, and in some cases, federal student loans, is considered a 100% meet need school.

We’ve compiled a list of the colleges around the country who identify themselves as 100% meet need, and have indicated the specifics of their programs below. A major difference between meet need programs is whether or not the college includes federal student loans in a student’s financial aid report. The colleges that include student loans keep the amount a student is expected to borrow reasonably low. In these instances, check with the college’s office of financial aid for additional information.

If you are interested in learning more about any of these colleges or universities click on their name to view their College Greenlight profile.

Note: 100% meet need schools pledge to meet a student’s full demonstrated need. Most students will still have an expected family contribution they are responsible for.

 Colleges and universities are indexed alphabetically

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Amherst College

Amherst College meets full demonstrated need of every admitted student. Students are not required to take out student loans as part of their financial aid awards.

Barnard College

Barnard College meets the demonstrated need of every admitted student. Students may be required to take out federal student loans as part of their financial aid awards.

Bates College

Bates College meets the demonstrated need of every admitted student. Students may be required to take out federal student loans as part of their financial aid awards.

Berea College 

Berea College meets the demonstrated need of every admitted student. Students may be required to take out federal student loans as part of their financial aid awards.

Boston College

Boston College meets the demonstrated need of every admitted student. Students may be required to take out federal student loans as part of their financial aid awards.

Bowdoin College

Bowdoin College meets full demonstrated need of every admitted student. Students are not required to take out student loans as part of their financial aid awards.

Brown University

Brown University meets full demonstrated need of every admitted student. Students with a combined family income profile under $100,000 are not required to take out student loans as part of their financial aid awards.

Bryn Mawr

Bryn Mawr meets the demonstrated need of every admitted student. Students may be required to take out federal student loans as part of their financial aid awards.

California Institute of Technology

California Institute of Technology meets the demonstrated need of every admitted student. Students may be required to take out federal student loans as part of their financial aid awards.

Carleton College

Carleton College meets the demonstrated need of every admitted student.  Students may be required to take out federal student loans as part of their financial aid awards.

Claremont McKenna College

Claremont McKenna College meets full demonstrated need of every admitted student. Students may be required to take out federal student loans as part of their financial aid awards.

Colby College

Colby College meets full demonstrated need of every admitted student. Students are not required to take out student loans as part of their financial aid awards.

Colgate University

Colgate University meets the demonstrated need of every admitted student. Students may be required to take out federal student loans as part of their financial aid awards.

College of the Holy Cross

College of the Holy Cross meets the demonstrated need of every admitted student. Students may be required to take out federal student loans as part of their financial aid awards.

Columbia University

Columbia University meets full demonstrated need of every admitted student. Students are not required to take out student loans as part of their financial aid awards.

Connecticut College

Connecticut College meets full demonstrated need of every admitted student. Students are not required to take out student loans as part of their financial aid awards if their family income is less than $50,000.

Cornell University

Cornell University meets the demonstrated need of every admitted student. Students with family income and assets over $75,000 may be required to take out federal student loans as part of their financial aid awards.

Dartmouth College

Dartmouth College meets the demonstrated need of every admitted student. Students with family income over $100,000 may be required to take out federal student loans as part of their financial aid awards.

Davidson College

Davidson College meets full demonstrated need of every admitted student. Students are not required to take out student loans as part of their financial aid awards.

Duke University

Duke University meets the demonstrated need of every admitted student. Students may be required to take out federal student loans as part of their financial aid awards if their family income exceeds $60,000.

Emory University

Emory University meets the demonstrated need of every admitted student. Students may be required to take out federal student loans as part of their financial aid awards.

Franklin & Marshall College

Franklin & Marshall meets full demonstrated need of every admitted student. Students are not required to take out student loans as part of their financial aid awards.

Franklin W. Olin College

Franklin W. Olin College meets full demonstrated need of every admitted student. Students are not required to take out student loans as part of their financial aid awards.

Georgetown University

Georgetown University meets the demonstrated need of every admitted student. Students may be required to take out federal student loans as part of their financial aid awards.

Gettysburg College

Gettysburg College meets the demonstrated need of every admitted student. Students may be required to take out federal student loans as part of their financial aid awards.

Grinnell College

Grinnell College meets the demonstrated need of every admitted student. Students may be required to take out federal student loans as part of their financial aid awards.

Hamilton College

Hamilton College meets the demonstrated need of every admitted student. Students may be required to take out federal student loans as part of their financial aid awards.

Harvard University

Harvard University meets full demonstrated need of every admitted student. Students are not required to take out student loans as part of their financial aid awards.

Harvey Mudd College

Harvey Mudd College meets the demonstrated need of every admitted student. Students may be required to take out federal student loans as part of their financial aid awards.

Haverford College

Haverford College meets full demonstrated need of every admitted student. Students are not required to take out student loans as part of their financial aid awards.

Kenyon College

Kenyon College meets the demonstrated need of every admitted student. Students may be required to take out federal student loans as part of their financial aid awards.

Lafayette College

Lafayette College is committed to meeting the full demonstrated need of all admitted students.  Families who have total income of more than $50,000 may require borrowing up to $4,500 per year to meet need.

Lehigh University

Lehigh University meets the demonstrated need of every admitted student.  Students may be required to take out federal student loans, but they have capped the amount to $5,000 per year.

Macalester College

Macalester College meets the demonstrated need of every admitted student. Students may be required to take out federal student loans as part of their financial aid awards.

Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Massachusetts Institute of Technology meets the demonstrated need of every admitted student. Students with family incomes over $75,000 may be required to take out federal student loans as part of their financial aid awards.

Middlebury College

Middlebury College meets the demonstrated need of every admitted student. Students may be required to take out federal student loans as part of their financial aid awards.

Mount Holyoke College

Mount Holyoke College meets the demonstrated need of every admitted student. Students may be required to take out federal student loans as part of their financial aid awards.

Northwestern University

Northwestern University meets the demonstrated need of every admitted student. Students who are eligible for Pell Grants are not required to take out federal student loans as part of their financial aid awards.

Oberlin College

Oberlin College meets the demonstrated need of every admitted student. Students may be required to take out federal student loans as part of their financial aid awards.

Occidental College

Occidental College meets the demonstrated need of every admitted student. Students may be required to take out federal student loans as part of their financial aid awards.

Pitzer College

Pitzer College meets the demonstrated need of every admitted student. Students may be required to take out federal student loans as part of their financial aid awards.

Pomona College

Pomona College meets full demonstrated need of every admitted student. Students are not required to take out student loans as part of their financial aid awards.

Princeton University

Princeton University meets full demonstrated need of every admitted student. Students are not required to take out student loans as part of their financial aid awards.

Reed College

Reed College meets the demonstrated need of every admitted student. Students may be required to take out federal student loans as part of their financial aid awards.

Rice University

Rice University meets the demonstrated need of every admitted student. Students with family incomes over $80,000 may be required to take out federal student loans as part of their financial aid awards.

University of Rochester

The University of Rochester meets the full calculated institutional need of admitted students through a combination of scholarships, grants, need-based loans, and work-study.

Scripps College

Scripps College meets the demonstrated need of every admitted student. Students may be required to take out federal student loans as part of their financial aid awards.

Smith College

Smith College meets the demonstrated need of every admitted student. Students may be required to take out federal student loans as part of their financial aid awards.

St. Olaf College

St. Olaf College meets the demonstrated need of every admitted student. Students may be required to take out federal student loans as part of their financial aid awards.

Stanford University

Stanford University meets full demonstrated need of every admitted student. Students are not required to take out student loans as part of their financial aid awards.

Swarthmore College

Swarthmore College meets full demonstrated need of every admitted student. Students are not required to take out student loans as part of their financial aid awards.

Thomas Aquinas College

Thomas Aquinas College meets the demonstrated need of every admitted student. Students may be required to take out federal student loans as part of their financial aid awards.

Trinity College

Trinity College meets the demonstrated need of every admitted student. Students may be required to take out federal student loans as part of their financial aid awards.

Tufts University

Tufts University meets the demonstrated need of every admitted student. Students may be required to take out federal student loans as part of their financial aid awards.

University of Chicago

University of Chicago meets the demonstrated need of every admitted student. Students with family incomes over $75,000 may be required to take out federal student loans as part of their financial aid awards.

University of North Carolina – Chapel Hill

UNC – Chapel Hill meets the demonstrated need of every admitted student. Students may be required to take out federal student loans as part of their financial aid awards.

University of Notre Dame

University of Notre Dame meets the demonstrated need of every admitted student. Students may be required to take out federal student loans as part of their financial aid awards.

University of Pennsylvania

University of Pennsylvania meets full demonstrated need of every admitted student. Students are not required to take out student loans as part of their financial aid awards.

University of Richmond

University of Richmond meets the demonstrated need of every admitted student. Students may be required to take out federal student loans as part of their financial aid awards.

University of Southern California

The University of Southern California meets the demonstrated need of every admitted student. Students may be required to take out federal student loans as part of their financial aid awards.

University of Virginia

University of Virginia meets the demonstrated need of every admitted student. Students whose family income is over 200% of the poverty line and whose assets exceed $75,000 may be required to take out federal student loans as part of their financial aid awards.

Vanderbilt University

Vanderbilt University meets full demonstrated need of every admitted student. Students are not required to take out student loans as part of their financial aid awards.

Vassar College

Vassar College meets the demonstrated need of every admitted student. Students with family incomes over $60,000 may be required to take out federal student loans as part of their financial aid awards.

Washington University in St. Louis

Washington University in St. Louis meets the demonstrated need of every admitted student. Students with family incomes over $60,000 may be required to take out federal student loans as part of their financial aid awards.

Wellesley College

Wellesley College meets the demonstrated need of every admitted student. Students with family incomes over $60,000 may be required to take out federal student loans as part of their financial aid awards.

Wesleyan University

Wesleyan University meets the demonstrated need of every admitted student. Students with family incomes over $40,000 may be required to take out federal student loans as part of their financial aid awards.

Williams College

Williams meets the demonstrated need of every admitted student. Students with family incomes over $75,000 may be required to take out federal student loans as part of their financial aid awards.

Washington and Lee University

Washington and Lee University meets full demonstrated need of every admitted student. Students are not required to take out student loans as part of their financial aid awards.

Yale University

Yale University meets full demonstrated need of every admitted student. Students are not required to take out student loans as part of their financial aid awards.

 

Photo by Greg Andersen

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