Tag archive for "historically black colleges and universities"

African American Students, Choosing A School, College Spotlight

Top 10 Historically Black Colleges and Universities

No Comments 14 February 2017

In honor of Black History month, we have compiled a list of the 10 best Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) in the country. Check out their College Greenlight profiles to learn more.

Spelman College – Atlanta

Spelman College is a private, all-women’s college, which originally was established as a female seminary in 1881. It is ranked in the top 50 liberal arts college in the country and consistently is ranked as the best HBCU in the nation. The college is the second-largest producer of black medical students in the country. Spelman’s academic departments have individual accreditation, which makes it one of the most accredited schools in the country.

Xavier University of Louisiana – New Orleans

Xavier has been continuing its mission of promoting leadership and service-based education initiatives since its founding in 1925. The university is the first educational institution in the nation that has produced black graduates with dual undergraduate degrees in biological/life sciences and the physical sciences.

Tuskegee University – Tuskegee, Ala.

Tuskegee University was founded by Booker T. Washington in 1881. The Princeton Review and U.S. News and World Report both ranked the university as one of the best HBCUs in the country. The university offers more than 40 undergraduate programs and almost 20 doctoral programs and professional degrees.

Howard UniversityWashington, D.C.

Howard is a research university that was founded in 1867 and is considered to be the most comprehensive HBCU in the country. The university offers a medical, law, dentistry and pharmacy colleges, along with a multiple research facilities that have been internally recognized in their respective fields.

Claflin University – Orangeburg, S.C.

Claflin was founded in 1869 by Methodist missionaries to educate freedmen.. The university boasts a world-class faculty and was recently named the best liberal arts college in South Carolina. Claflin offers more than 35 undergraduate and graduate degree programs.

North Carolina A&T State University – Greensboro, N.C.

North Carolina A&T State was established in 1891 as a vocational college for black students. Today, the college is recognized as a top-notch research university with the best college of engineering in the country. It has produced the most black engineers who pursue a master’s or terminal degree in their chosen field.

Hampton University ­– Hampton, Va.

Hampton University was established in 1868 as a school that would teach freedmen and their children to enter into citizenship. The university offers more than 75 different degree programs in 40 areas of study across 11 schools. Hampton also holds the rare distinction of being the only HBCU to ever have 100 percent control over a NASA mission.

Morehouse College – Atlanta

Morehouse was founded in 1867 as a private institution for men and has graduated more black men than any other school. The college’s mission includes educating students about black history and culture through programs and scholarships. Martin Luther King Jr. and Spike Lee are Morehouse alumni.

Florida A&M University – Tallahassee, Fla.

Florida A&M was founded in 1887 as an institution dedicated to African-American education. The university offers 54 bachelor’s degrees, 29 master’s degrees, three professional degrees and 12 doctoral programs. These programs have increased black student involvement in science, technology, engineering and math.

Fisk University – Nashville, Tenn.

Fisk was founded in 1866, shortly after the end of the Civil War. As part of its core curriculum, Fisk students must take one course that explores African-American literature and African history. The university also is home to the first chapter of the Phi Beta Kappa Society on a predominantly black campus.

African American Students, Diversity, Federal Loans

Student Loan Debts at Historically Black Colleges and Universities

No Comments 20 January 2017

People who attend historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) typically have larger amounts of student loan debt than those at traditional universities. Debt loads at HBCU’s tend to be larger because many students are low-income and/or first-generation.

According to the United Negro College Fund’s report, FEWER RESOURCES, MORE DEBT: Loan Debt Burdens Students at Historically Black Colleges and Universities, HBCU students typically graduate with higher debt loads because they borrow at a higher rate than their non-HBCU peers. According to a 2013 study, HBCU students borrow an average of $26,266 in federal loans. Non-HBCU students borrow an average of $14,881.

HBCU students also have lower loan repayment rates than their non-HBCU counterparts. According to the report: “Seven years after leaving college, the average cohort repayment rate for HBCU students is considerably lower than that for students at non-HBCUs (59 percent vs. 85 percent).” This rate, however, does not include factors that impact repayment rates such as student economic status, labor market conditions and choice of educational program.

Another issue facing HBCU students is that more come from families with lower incomes than their non-HBCU peers. In 2005, the median family income of students at HBCUs was $28,400. That is about half the median family income ($51,400) for students who attend non-HBCUs. The discrepancy in income limits the ability of an HBCU student to pay for college. Thus, HBCU students have large amounts of unmet need that require them to take out student loans.

HBCU institutions have limited resources, which hinders their ability to provide grants to students. In 2015, the top 10 HBCU endowments to provide grants to students ranged from $34 million to $660 million. The endowments for non-HBCU institutions that year ranged from $10 billion to $36 billion.

Suggestions to reduce the HBCU student debt loan

  • Policymakers should reduce the complicated nature of the federal student aid eligibility process and provide more aid to those in need
  • Grant aid and work-study opportunities should be increased
  • Federal loans should be less costly for students and their families
  • The federal student loan servicing system repayment process should be more manageable, effective and efficient

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